Lighting technology has evolved, leading to more efficient and cost-effective solutions. One of the most notable advancements is the shift from traditional metal halide lights to LED lights. This blog post delves into the technical aspects of this transition, focusing on comparing power consumption and efficiency between LED and metal halide lights, and how the conversion will dramatically reduce amp draw.

What is the AMP Draw Calculation

It is easy to calculate amp draw if you know the watts consumed and the voltage of the product. In general, higher voltage products tend to consume less amps. That is why it is advantageous to run circuits within your facility at 240V, 277V, or 480V instead of 120V.

Amps can be easily calculated using the formula: Amps = Watts / Volts. Here are some quick examples of amp draw for a 150-watt LED light at 4 common voltages:

150 Watts / 120 Volts = 1.25 Amps

150 Watts / 240 Volts = 0.625 Amps

150 Watts / 277 Volts = 0.5415 Amps

150 Watts / 480 Volts = 0.3125 Amps





For purposes of the blog posts, for every metal halide wattage we mention, we will be adding 15% watts consumed. This is the watts consumed by the metal halide ballast. So a 400 Watt Metal Halide bulb in a fixture consumes around 460 Watts.

 

Technical Comparison: Amp Draw and Efficiency

250 Watt Metal Halide vs. 100 Watt LED

Metal Halide: A 250W metal halide light, with 15% for ballast draw, draws a total of 287.5 Watts.

120 Volts

250 Watts Metal Halide: 2.3958 amps

100 Watts LED: 0.8333 amps

240 Volts

250 Watts Metal Halide: 1.1979 amps

100 Watts LED: 0.4167 amps

277 Volts

250 Watts Metal Halide: 1.0378 amps

100 Watts LED: 0.3613 amps

480 Volts

250 Watts Metal Halide: 0.5993 amps

100 Watts LED: 0.2083 amps

400 Watt Metal Halide vs. 150 Watt LED

Metal Halide: A 400W metal halide light, with 15% for ballast draw, draws a total of 460 Watts.

120 Volts

400 Watts Metal Halide: 3.8333 amps

150 Watts LED: 1.25 amps

240 Volts

400 Watts Metal Halide: 1.9167 amps

150 Watts LED: 0.625 amps

277 Volts

400 Watts Metal Halide: 1.6615 amps

150 Watts LED: 0.5415 amps

480 Volts

400 Watts Metal Halide: 0.9583 amps

150 Watts LED: 0.3125 amps

1000 Watt Metal Halide vs. 300 Watt LED

Metal Halide: A 1000W metal halide light, with 15% for ballast draw, draws a total of 1150 Watts.

120 Volts

1000 Watts Metal Halide: 9.5833 amps

300 Watts LED: 2.5 amps

240 Volts

1000 Watts Metal Halide: 4.79165 amps

300 Watts LED: 1.25 amps

277 Volts

1000 Watts Metal Halide: 4.1506 amps

300 Watts LED: 1.0830 amps

480 Volts

1000 Watts Metal Halide: 2.3958 amps

300 Watts LED: 0.6250 amps

1500 Watt Metal Halide vs. 450 Watt LED

Metal Halide: A 1500W metal halide light, with 15% for ballast draw, draws a total of 1725 Watts.

120 Volts

1500 Watts Metal Halide: 14.38 amps

450 Watts LED: 3.75 amps

240 Volts

1500 Watts Metal Halide: 7.19 amps

450 Watts LED: 1.88 amps

277 Volts

1500 Watts Metal Halide: 6.23 amps

450 Watts LED: 1.62 amps

480 Volts

1500 Watts Metal Halide: 3.59 amps

450 Watts LED: 0.94 amps

Implications and Advantages for Electricians and Building Owners

The transition from metal halide to LED lighting offers several advantages, including reduced amp draw. The reduced amp draw of LEDs will lead to a lower electrical load. This is especially helpful in large-scale lighting applications.

Dwayne Kula

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About the Author

Dwayne Kula is President of LED Lighting Supply. On any given day, Dwayne is writing content for the site and helps manage the marketing initiatives that are on-going. He has a Software Engineering degree and still dabbles in writing software for the company as needed. When not working, he enjoys spending time with his family, working out, playing the occasional game of golf and exploring New England.

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